Posted by: joels | March 9, 2008

Who Speaks for Islam? What a Billion Muslims Really Think

Who Speaks for Islam?Who Speaks for Islam? What a Billion Muslims Really Think (Gallup Press; March 2008) by Georgetown University Professor John L. Esposito and Dalia Mogahed sheds new light into what majorities of the world’s Muslims really think and feel.”

Read the full story on the Georgetown University website. The article highlights the following findings:

  • Muslims and Americans are equally likely to reject attacks on civilians as morally unjustifiable.
  • Large majorities of Muslims would guarantee free speech if it were up to them to write a new constitution and they say religious leaders should have no direct role in drafting that constitution.
  • Muslims around the world say that what they least admire about the West is its perceived moral decay and breakdown of traditional values — the same answers that Americans themselves give when asked this question.
  • When asked about their dreams for the future, Muslims say they want better jobs and security, not conflict and violence.
  • Muslims say the most important thing Westerners can do to improve relations with their societies is to change their negative views toward Muslims and respect Islam.

I hope to read through the study in the near future, and perhaps post some thoughts on it.

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Responses

  1. […] assadleon wrote an interesting post today onHere’s a quick excerpt“Who Speaks for Islam? What a Billion Muslims Really Think (Gallup Press; March 2008) by Georgetown University Professor John L. Esposito and Dalia Mogahed sheds new light into what majorities of the world’s Muslims really think and … […]

  2. One can only hope–no, pray–that these conceptions will come to dominate Islam. Something like this can hopefully play a big role in reshaping attitudes in the Middle East.

  3. I read through the book and found it very helpful. It is on my recommendation list for those who want to have respectful and yet faithful friendships with our Muslim neighbors. We need more of this, and more “thick descriptions” of the varied cultures of followers of Islam who cross our paths. Blessings.


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